Character

Rutland has a rich built and historic environment. Buildings reflect the quarrying heritage of the county and it is thanks to this that Rutland has a plethora of heritage buildings featuring different shades of ironstone, which provide a distinctive character.

Rutland’s sandstones and ironstones have commonly been used for buildings throughout the county, while its limestones provide building stones of both local and national importance. More recent developments have failed to reflect local built character, and have resulted in poor quality, incongruous additions to our towns and villages. RCC are keen to take a leading role in the realisation of the masterplan to ensure that this is not the case at St George’s Barracks. Simple but good design using local materials will help to deliver a new community of enduring quality.

Character is derived not only from built form elements but also from the landscape. It will therefore be important that existing landscape features are integrated and enhanced wherever possible. These will be complemented by a comprehensive landscape structure, creating a strong sense of place.

  1. RUTLAND’S OLDER COTTAGES ARE GENERALLY BUILT FROM LIMESTONE OR IRONSTONE
  2. LIMESTONE BUILDINGS SIT COMFORTABLY NEXT TO RENDERED FACADES
  3. LOCAL LIMESTONE WITH COLLYWESTON ROOFS IS PREVALENT
  4. UPPINGHAM STONE
  5. A SUBSTANTIAL NUMBER OF BUILDINGS WERE CONSTRUCTED IN BRICK IN THE LATE 18TH/EARLY 19TH CENTURY
  6. BUILDINGS IN OAKHAM MARKET SQUARE COMPRISE A RANGE OF MATERIALS
  7. THATCHED ROOFS ARE NOT UNCOMMON

RUTLAND CHARACTER EXAMPLES

Density

Badly designed higher density housing can make a place feel cramped, oppressive and overcrowded, and lead to a sea of cars. Getting density too low leads to urban sprawl, feelings of isolation, car dependency and can undermine the viability of public transport and other facilities.

Density is mainly experienced from visual clues. Impressions of high, low or appropriate density are influenced by many factors, including building heights, spaces between buildings, the amount of parking and streets, and the colour and tone of materials. For example, in villages, a terrace development that fills a gap along a street may have a higher density than a detached property. However, the terrace house would look more natural and less out of place.

Therefore, a scheme that relates well in form and pattern to its surroundings is likely to be perceived to be at the right density, irrespective of any figures.

Whilst an average density of 29 dwellings per hectare (dph) is proposed across the site, this will comprise a range of densities reflecting different character areas. For example, those areas along the southern and eastern edges of the site are likely to contain lower densities, whilst it will be appropriate for the local centre to be higher. Some examples of different densities are provided above.

  1. BOURNVILLE, BIRMINGHAM -20 DPH
  2. DERWENTHORPE – 27 DPH
  3. LETCHWORTH GARDEN CITY- 30 DPH
  4. EDENBROOK, FLEET – 33 DPH
  5. NEWHALL, HARLOW – 36 DPH
  6. ACCORDIA, CAMBRIDGE – 40 DPH
  7. WATERCOLOUR, REDHILL – 45 DPH
  8. GREAT KNEIGTON, CAMBRIDGE – 50 DPH
  9. UPTON, NORTHAMPTON – 55 DPH

DENSITY EXAMPLES